Ahhhhh Italy

Italy is Eataly

We traveled to Italy in October. The food was fabulous and the scenery was spectacular.

Bay of Fegina Monterosso del Mare

The Cinque Terre (the five lands) was our favorite destination. Monterosso del Mare has the most beautiful beach of the five towns on the Italian Riviera. We stayed at the Hotel Pasquale, a small family-run hotel in the heart of this ancient village overlooking the Liguorian Sea.

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We were treated to a homemade Italian meal by Felicita, daughter of the original owners, and current co-owner with her husband and children.

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A personal demonstration of homemade pesto using a mortar and pestle.

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 The pesto was very fresh and bright.

lasagne al forno

Lasagne al Forno. Can you believe the amount of pesto atop?

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Our fellow travelers.

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Felicita and me.

The Fearless Cooking Club members gathered and made some of the Italian recipes. Barb and Cindy had been to Europe this past summer and stopped into Italy also.

Fearless Cooker w/fancy oven mitts

We tried our hand at mortar and pestle pesto.

Porchetta

Barb and Joe made this beautiful porchetta, they ate in Italy. It was a WOW!

mortar and pestle

The one in the foreground is marble with ribbed inner edges of the bowl.

presto pesto

Presto Pesto!

Felicita’s Pesto Sauce Recipe

Two servings pesto sauce

Ingredients

  • 80 Basil leaves
  • 1 garlic close
  • 2 TBSP pine nuts
  • Parmesan cheese grated

Directions

Only wash basil leaves and dry on the tea towel.  Add 1 garlic close. Grind. Add 2 TBSP pine nuts. Grind. Mis with two heaping tablespoon parmesan cheese grated. Add olive oil until creamy consistency.  Have a good meal! Felicita.

Patty’s Points

1. Felicita’s pesto had a very loose consistency more like a sauce then a thick paste. We think it had to do with the moisture in the leaves from being so close to the sea nearby. We live in dry Colorado so our pesto was more like a paste.

2. Her recipe differs from most pestos I’ve made. She added no salt and very little garlic. You are tasting the freshness of the basil.

3. Our tour guide, Jamie, a Brit who has a home in Lucca, was quite the foodie. He advised us about only buying pine nuts from Italy and to stay away from the ones from China. My olive oil was from Italy but the pine nuts I found were from Spain. Sorry Jamie.

4. We used two different types of olive oils in each pesto recipe we made. We noticed a big difference in the taste from the olive oils. I pays to taste your olive oil and find one you like. Have you heard of the bug that has destroyed many of the olives in Italy? Olive oil prices will rise over the next year. Eeek!

5. We had two mortar bowls that were quite different. One had ridges on the bowl lining and one without. The combination of the pestle grinding and ridges in the bowl made the grinding process go quickly.

6. You’ll notice in the recipe it calls for 80 leaves of basil. If you have really large leaves then count it as two leaves. The amount of leaves accounts for the pure taste of the basil also.

7. Eataly.com is a global company that promotes Italian products worldwide. When you go to Italy you see  authentic products in local towns. But when you are at home you don’t have access to those authentic products. Eataly.com is one way to find specialty pastas and probably pine nuts too! I saw a pasta in Monterosso that I should have bought. It looked like a communion wafer. When we went out to dinner that night, one of our fellow travelers had that pasta Croxetti. It is specifically made in the the Liguorian areas of Italy. It would take awhile for me to hunt it down and see if it exists in the Italian sections of my city.  So I would have to either make it or buy it through Eataly.com.

8. Lastly, Jamie our guide, said that when we all go home and try to recreate the Italian food, it won’t taste the same. I have to agree. The ingredients may be basil, olives, pine nuts, oranges, or lemons but they are grown in a different location of the world with different sun, water, soil, bugs, and weather conditions.

9. By the way, the lasagne al forno was homemade lasagne pasta sheets with a parmesan besciamella sauce through each layer. With that substantial amount of pesto atop it melted in my mouth. Delizioso! I could never recreate that sensation ever again at home.

10. Lastly, according to Felicita, the true term pesto only refers to the basil, olive oil, parmesan cheese and nuts (pine, walnuts) combination.

Until we meet again Italy! Arrivederci!

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Limoncello New Year

Remember last month when I went to my friend Phyllis’ home and made liqueur? Well the limoncello needed time to ferment. One month later, it has come to fruition.
Rosemary Limoncello

Italy’s Amalfi Coast and adjoining Sorrento Peninsula are the regions most famous for limoncello, an intensely lemony liqueur, traditionally served ice cold as an aperitif or digestive after-dinner drink. Some believe that limoncello  was used in the morning by fishermen and countrymen to fight the cold, since the invasion periods. Others, instead, believe that the recipe was born inside a monastic convent to delight the monks from prayer to prayer.

Rosemary Limoncello from Sunset Magazine December 2007

Ingredients:  18 lemons + 4 to 6 inch rosemary sprig + Two 750 ml 60 Proof Vodka + 4 1/2 C sugar + 5 C water

Directions:

Peel lemons with a sharp vegetable peeler, taking only the zest (top layer) and avoiding any white pith. Put rosemary in a 1-gal. glass or ceramic container with a tight seal. Add zest to jar.

Lemons scrubbed clean

Lemon peel

Pour one bottle of 750 ml vodka over rosemary and zest; seal container. Let sit undisturbed in a cool, dark place for 40 days.

In a saucepan, bring 5 cups water to a boil and add sugar. Cook, stirring, until sugar has dissolved. Let sugar syrup cool to room temperature, about 1 hour.

Fermenting

Pour syrup and remaining 750 ml. vodka over lemon-vodka mixture, stir, and seal container. Let sit in a cool, dark place for another 40 days.

Pour limoncello through cheesecloth into a large spouted pitcher and divide among gift bottles.

Straining

Rosemary

Phyllis’ and Sunset Magazine Points:

1. Phyllis prefers this recipe to the traditional Italian Limoncello recipes. She likes vodka which she believes is less bitter than ones made with Ever-clear.

2. When peeling lemons do not include the white pith which will make the drink bitter.

3. This rosemary came from a ranch in Idaho and Phyllis gave it to me. It is nearly 3 months old and is as fresh as if it was cut today. This drink was a favorite of her late husband.

4. Either Meyer or Eureka lemons work in this recipe (the fragrant Meyer is especially good, though). To speed up the process, shorten the infusing time in steps 2 and 4 to 1 week each, and you’ll have a fine although less intense liqueur. Limoncello keeps indefinitely in the freezer.

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Oh Aioli!

The Fearless Cooking Club challenge for March are eggs. Eggs are so spring-like and so versatile. You can use just the yolk, the whites or both. Eggs can be whipped, sautéed, baked, scrambled, fried, poached, boiled, and emulsified and be put into almost any dish. And eggs are everywhere these days. The March edition of Cooking Light  focused on comfort foods had a fried egg on top of many recipes. And on Worst Cooks in America, Chef Anne Burrell had the contestants pattern a diner dish she made with French Fries a cheese sauce and a fried egg atop.

Last summer I was was watching From Spain with Love  on The Cooking Channel when I saw a chef make garlic mayonnaise with an immersion blender. The concoction was whipped together in less than a minute. I was flabbergasted that this blender could be used for more than pureeing soup in a pot. So I knew I had to have one.

I did get an immersion blender for Christmas and I love it. And because my inspiration was aioli I had to make it for this egg challenge. Aioli  (alhòli) comes from Provençal alh ‘garlic’ (< Latin allium) + òli ‘oil’ (< Latin oleum) = garlic oil.

As with my last challenge of making macarons which had four ingredients, the key was to master the technique for a fabulous end product; aioli is the same, all about technique.

I scoured cookbooks and websites on how to make aioli and oh my goodness there are a lot of versions. As a result I went through a lot of garlic, olive oil and eggs. I bet I made 5-6 batches of aioli.

I started with Julia Child Mastering the Art of French Cooking I and II. Julia had several aioli recipe versions which were all to be whipped by hand. She started with a piece of stale bread soaked in milk and combined the garlic and salt with a mortar and pestle. She then added the eggs and hand whipped all the while slowly drizzing in 1 -1 1/2 cups of olive oil.

Then I moved onto the internet and watched videos of hand whipping and immersion blender techniques of making aioli. I took the techniques from each chef and incorporated them into what would work for me. Finally, I found the recipe that tasted the best and would allow me to use my immersion blender.  The Wishful Chef Homemade Garlic Mayonnaise recipe was perfect and the right combination for me.

Patty’s Points on Technique:

1. Eggs. Okay yes mayonnaise uses raw egg yolks at room temperature. If you are squeamish make sure you: a) buy fresh eggs, b) wash the exterior shell, and c) coddle the egg. To coddle an egg for this recipe you place the whole egg in shell into a pot of boiling water for one minute. Remove the egg, crack  and separate the yolk from the partially cooked white.

2. Oil. Most of the recipes I read said not to use extra virgin olive oil but you use regular olive oil. Many recipes also advised to use two kinds of oil, like olive oil with cannola or grape seed oil to temper the strong taste of olive oil.

3. Garlic. The garlic clove must be minced and mashed into a past with the salt to extract the garlic oils. I saw techniques using a good chopping knife or a mortar and pestle. I used the knife method and it took awhile to mash it into a paste. I will probably invest in a mortar and pestle because it probably would’ve been easier.

4. Temperature. All the ingredients must be at room temperature or slightly warmed for the emulsion of liquid to mayonnaise to occur.

5. Taste. The unfortunate part of making mayonnaise is that you really can’t tell what it tastes like until it is completed. My second batch had great texture, but it tasted bad so I threw it out. I made a cilantro aioli (in the picture above) that called for 1/4 cup of lime juice. That much lime juice overpowered the recipe and gave it a harsh taste. I couldn’t taste the garlic, oil or cilantro.

6. Serving. This was probably my biggest challenge. I made a condiment and what do I serve it with? Below is a picture of my first batch which tasted good but was really runny. I served it with asparagus and panko crusted shrimp. Julia Child served aioli by placing it into a Garlic Soup or a Fish Stew. The Fish Stew was very good, the Garlic Soup was a little too thin of a broth for my tastes. I’ve also seen recipes that put it on sandwiches, just like any old mayonnaise, but more flavorful.

Today I may serve my aioli with a vegetable or sweet potato chips as in the picture above or with some fresh asparagus and just use it as a dip.

Fearless but exhausted over making mayonnaise.

My next post will be the pictures of the Fearless Cookers dishes at the Eggs-travaganza Dinner.

Mangia Pasta!

The July meeting of  The Fearless Cooking Club takes us to Barb’s home. Barb has been to Italy and I’ve seen her fabulous pictures. Barb dusted off her pasta maker, drying rack and pulled out Beard on Pasta cookbook and taught us a thing or two about making homemade pasta.

Barb did her homework and studied the master James Beard. There were several key points that Barb noted.

1. Plan in advance. Chef Beard recommends that the dough rest for 30 to 120 minutes after mixing (the actual recipe is at the end of this blog).

2. It takes time. Homemade pasta is labor intensive. It took two or three of us to hold the dough above the pasta maker, turn the crank and pull dough out for flattening. It takes 3-4 cranks through with the pasta maker to get the thickness for the dough correct. We talked about how the TV chefs make it look so easy. They can hold the dough, crank it through masterfully, and get beautiful flattened dough and  noodles on the other side.

3. Take a break. Whew! That was hard work. Pour the wine and have a snack.

4. Make your sauces. While the pasta is drying on the rack make your sauces. We had four to sample:

  • A basic basil pesto using pine nuts from The New Best Recipe – Cook’s Illustrated (2004)
  • Pesto Trapanese all Anna – A Lidia Bastianich recipe from her website
  • An easy Puttanesca – aka “the way a streetwalker would make it” from The Denver Post Make It Fit series (2010)
  • A creamy alfredo sauce made by Sarah. She used cream cheese and parmesan cheese in it. Interesting twist!

5. Prepare salads and desserts. I made a homemade Caesar salad from my standby cookbook The New Best Recipe – Cook’s Illustrated (2004) We had homemade puff pastry made by Barb. She said they were so easy to make. The filling came all the way from Pat-A-Cake, a cake decorating store in 316 W Norfolk Ave, Norfolk NE 68701, Phone:  (402) 379-2061. And lastly, Char made her famous Pizzelles.

4. Cooking the pasta. Beard recommends to boil the water furiously; the water does not need salt, but a splash of oil is a good idea. I found this to be an interesting tip because most TV chefs I’ve watched only salt the water and never add oil. But they are not making homemade pasta I guess.

5. Fresh pasta cooks quickly. It does not need the standard 8 – 10 minutes; after placing pasta in the boiling water, it is usually ready by the time the water returns to a boil. Test by biting into a piece of the pasta – it should be pliable with no hard core. Drain pasta when done. It is best not to let pasta sit while sauce finishes. Try to have sauce ready to coat the pasta as soon as it comes out of the water.

Voila!

We made fettucine and spaghetti. Turning out the spaghetti was interesting. It was so thin we thought it looked like angel hair pasta. But it plumped up in the water.

The table is ready! We even had pasta bibs to wear!

Clockwise from top left spaghetti with pesto;  fettucine puttanesca; fettucine alfredo, spaghetti al pesto trapanese alla Anna.

Of course, we must have dessert. Plated is fresh cherries, a pizzelle and a cream puff.

And to top off the weekend, celebrating all Italian culture, Joy, my husband and I went to mass at Our Lady of Mt Carmel Church in the Highland neighborhood of Denver. The first Sunday of each month, the mass is said in Italian. It was amazing.

James Beard’s Basic Egg Pasta (serves 3 – 4)
Using Food Processor and Manual Pasta Machine

1 1/2 Cups all-purpose flour
1/2 tsp salt
2 large eggs
1 TBSP oil

Put metal blade into food processor. Measure in the flour and salt, and process briefly to blend them. Drop the eggs and oil through the feeding tube, and let the machine run until the dough begins to form a ball – around 15 seconds. If too sticky, add a tablespoon or more of flour. If too dry add a few drops of water or part of an egg.

COOKS NOTE: Barb misplaced the dough blade for her food processor, so she used the regular blade. She ran the processor 15 seconds per instructions – it did not form a ball. She poured the mixture onto a floured surface and was easily able to form it into a ball.

Turn out dough onto a floured surface. Dust your hands with flour and continue kneading. Work for 3 – 5 minutes, adding more flour if necessary, until you have a smooth ball of dough.

Set to rest under a dish towel or in plastic wrap for a minimum of 30 minutes, but 2 hours is preferable.

After dough has rested, cut it into four pieces. Put three back under the dish towel and flatten the fourth with a rolling-pin or with your palm. Set the manual pasta machine so that the rollers are at their widest opening. We ran it through each setting twice, then narrowed the opening, until we completed setting 5. You’ll know when it is rolled enough because the dough will become smooth and satiny. Pasta dough is not delicate and can not be overhandled – if it tears, you can fold in half and run it through again.

Lay the ribbon of pasta on a dish towel while you roll out the other three pieces of dough.

The dough should rest another 5 minutes after rolling; typically the first ribbon will be ready by the time you finish rolling all 4 pieces of dough.

Place the hand crank into the cutting slot of your choice. Run the ribbons of pasta dough through; it helps to have one person crank and a second person feed and catch the pasta.

Place the pasta on a drying rack of some kind – if you don’t have a pasta rack you can use the back of a chair, a clothesline, etc. Let it dry.

**See you all next month when The Fearless Cooking Club will be celebrating the Spanish culture and making Paella.**